Text Pinches

Text Pinches

I'm that gal who says, "Friends don't let friends send thoughtful texts full of typos."

I'm that gal who says, "Friends don't let friends send thoughtful texts full of typos."

Do you ever get text messages that make you squint because you are trying to figure out what the sender is trying to say?  Not just because of an auto correct mistake but because the text is cryptic.  

I receive messages from three people that never EVER send a text without a typo or mistake. Even if the text only contains three words - at least one word out of the three is either autocorrected into a wrong word -"Happy Be-Latex Birthday", the wrong version of the word - "We're partying their" and/or misspelled - "I Loe u." 

I totally get that spelling is not important when texting and the text language is fast paced. Obviously text messages are not meant for thesis writing.  But are we so busy that before we hit SEND we just cannot look up to make sure autocorrect doesn't autoembarrass? On one hand, no one's feelings are hurt if the texts are direct and blunt.  But on the other hand, we are all on the go - no one is less busier than the other. My point is - taking time to have to decipher or break codes in order to understand a text is annoying. The opposite of thoughtfulness is thoughtless. We get it.  Your time is scarce and valuable - but so is ours! 

Pretend your name is Klaudette, it is your birthday and you receive the following text as a birthday wish:

"happy birthday caught at thinking of you today and tomorrow hope you have a great celebration what a perfect place to be for that love you"

How long did it take for you to figure out that text as it was sent? As is - just like that. There is no punctuation or any regard that Klaudette was spelled "caught at". Is Klaudette's birthday gift having to solve the text message? Sorry, I’m completely throwing my bestie under the bus. I'm hoping maybe she can have a good laugh at her own expense. This text is a perfect example of how something so sweet can be such a buzz-kill. 

Supporters of the cryptic text message would say, “Well, it's the thought that counts." While the other camp says, "What thought are we counting?"  Is it the thought that spelling her name correctly wasn't important? Or is it perfectly acceptable for the quick thought because it came from a very busy person? Or is it more thoughtful to send a wish with typos than no birthday wish at all? Are these the kinds of thoughts that we should be counting? Obviously you know which camp I belong to for this scenario.  I admit that I sound like an ungrateful, judging b*tch.  No one has the right to judge anyone for texting a birthday wish.  However, I have to point out the lack of thought - thoughtlessness - because I hope to make a POSITIVE change. The entire reason that my blog exists is to S-P-R-E-A-D thoughtfulness!

If you've got places to go, people to see then your life is pretty busy. I would guess 90% of Americans over the age of five years old have stuff going on that keeps them busy.  If there is no time to proof-read the texts that are meant to be thoughtful then maybe it's time to hire an assistant.  I can help with that! There is no question that people's hearts are in the right place and that they are thoughtful enough to send a wish in the first place. I'm the friend who will be brutally honest and call it like it is: When you send a text message as a thoughtful pinch, please take the time to correct the mistakes - even if it’s after you sent it too quickly.  Save someone time of having to figure out what you’re trying to tell them.

Remember: It's very thoughtful to send a nice text. It's even more thoughtful to send a text without needing a decoder ring to solve it.   Let me know if I should make shirts that say, "Friends shouldn't let other friends text thoughtful pinches full of typos and mistakes." 

Pinches,

Barb

 

 

 

 

do you ever get text messages that make you squint and try to figure out what the sender is trying to say?  Not just because of an auto correct mistake but because the sentence doesn't make sense.  

I receive messages from two people that never ever have send a text without a typo in it.  Sometimes, even if the text only contains three words - at least 1 out of 3 is either misspelled, the wrong version of the word - "we're partying their" and or missing a letter  "Lve u" 

I get that spelling is not important when texting and the text language is fast paced - not meant to be used for thesis writing.  But are we all that busy that before we hit send we cannot just look up and make sure autocorrect didn't autoembarrass? We are all on the go - no one is less busy than another. Also, no one's feelings are hurt if the texts are blunt and to the point.  But the opposite of thoughtfulness is not thinking about others and I just want to point out that taking my time to have to decipher or code break for the meanings of the text is annoying.  

Pretend your name is Klaudette and it was your birthday and you got this text as a birthday wish:

"happy birthday caught at thinking of you today and tomorrow hope you have a great celebration what a perfect place to be for that love you"

How long does it take for you to read that text as it was sent? Just like that. No punctuation or any regard that Klaudette was spelled "caught at". Is the birthday gift having to solve the text message? She gets 5 minutes of mystery entertainment.  I'm totally throwing my bestie under the bus and I hope she can have a laugh at her own expense but it's a perfect example of how something so sweet can be so annoying. 

Is this when we say, "It's the thought that counts"? Because if so, what thought are you sending? Are you telling the birthday girl that you're a person on the go and if you don't get this text out as is - typos and all, then it doesn't get done at all? If you've got places to go, people to see then your life is busy and there is no time to proof-read your bday wish texts.  Maybe then, it's time to hire an assistant.  Thoughtful Pinch at your service!

Pinches,

Barb

 

 

 

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