Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

Instagram Message: Her dad is Filipino? Rowan will celebrate her first Constitution and Citizenship Day this Sunday. Check the blog for pinches. 

Instagram Message: Her dad is Filipino? Rowan will celebrate her first Constitution and Citizenship Day this Sunday. Check the blog for pinches. 

I’m taking the plunge.  I will attempt to teach my kids about citizenship this week.  Oh yes..I’m going down that road!  On Saturday, September 17, 2016 - the United States will observe or celebrate Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. According to Wikipedia, observing this particular date commemorates the formation and signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787 and recognizes all who, by coming of age or naturalization, have become citizens.  Citizenship Day has been celebrated since 1911 and as recently as 2004 it has been modified to add Constitution Day. Since then, the 2004 law mandated that all public-funded schools and federal agencies need to provide education on the American Constitution.

The timing of this celebration couldn’t be better with the wonderful election {looming} ahead and all this talk about immigration and the protection our constitutional rights.  I have decided to turn my blog into a platform and give you my opinion on both topics. Just kidding! That’s not happening at all.  Even though there is so much talk about whether or not to stand during the National Anthem and whether or not we should build a wall, I am not going down THAT road.  No thanks, I’ll leave the politics out and skip all the issues about our freedom and rights. Let’s just talk about the thoughtful pinches I’m giving to the happy citizens in my life.

Citizenship 101.  These are the citizens who are born into the role of being an American Citizen.  The majority of US citizens are born from two parents who are American citizens.  However, even though both of my parents were not citizens at the time of my birth I was automatically a citizen because I was born in good ole Norfolk, VA.  But just because I was born as a citizen, it doesn’t automatically make me a GOOD citizen. I remember when I was a kid in Cockeysville, MD, my whole elementary school would gather in the cafeteria and the principal would call us up one by one to present us with a certificate that declared to the world that we were good citizens (I’m sure my mom still has mine somewhere). This is not to be confused with the principal’s honors awards (because I rarely got those), these were “Good Citizen” certificates.  These official documents represented the great job we did by being good listeners, showing respect, following the school rules etc. I’m sure my young self felt so proud to be recognized and awarded by this certificate. Maybe it was all I needed to be encouraged to keep up the good work. Maybe that piece of paper was enough to keep me motivated to earn one every year. I mean, after all, I did grow up in an era when medals and awards were not passed around freely to everyone who participated.  I’m going to give these certificates to each of my kids as a thoughtful pinch and who knows? It could matter that much to them too. 

I will have to decorate the edges for the fancy effect.  I think it would be fun for the kids to make one up for their dad.  We can do a goofy one and make him laugh.  

I will have to decorate the edges for the fancy effect.  I think it would be fun for the kids to make one up for their dad.  We can do a goofy one and make him laugh.  

Intermediate Citizenship - These are citizens like my parents. My mom was born in the Philippines and came to the United States on July 9, 1966.  She married my dad in November 1967 in Jersey City, NJ.  My dad was also born in the Philippines and was also not an American citizen but was in the US Navy as part of a reciprocality program. He became a citizen in 1972 - I was three years old.  Because my mom was married to a citizen she was able to get a Green Card and continued to live in the US for three more years before she was eligible to apply for citizenship.  She eventually became a citizen in February of 1977 - my brother was less than two years old. Now, if I were to send thoughtful pinches to all of the citizens in my mom’s family and my dad’s family who obtained their citizenship like my parents, I’d be broke for sure! So I think I’ll post something on FB and call it a day.  

Advanced Citizenship - In my book, these citizens are people with dual citizenships. They go back and forth between their two “home” countries. These citizens live like the celebs who reside in NY and work in LA or vice versa. Bi-coastal living. Dual countries. Two home towns. I feel like that gets complicated. And if you really want to be a total jet setter, I’m pretty sure you can apply for citizenship in more than two countries.  Chances are if someone calls two or more countries “Home” they must enjoy traveling. A thoughtful pinch for the dual citizen in your life would be this travel bag.  

In the words of Theodore Roosevelt, "The first requisite of a good citizen in this Republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight.”  Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is a great opportunity to give a pinch to someone who is pulling their weight. 

Pinches,

Barb

 

 

 

 

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